• Lisa S. Larsen, PsyD

Spiritual Wellness

Updated: Jan 10, 2018

How does spirituality help your physical wellness?


When people feel ill, they may not necessarily think about their spiritual resources at that time. This varies, of course, but most people think of the medical community as the first line of resource. For most people, it is. However, there are times when your mental, emotional, and spiritual mindset can make it big difference in how you feel. The attributions and appraisals that you make about your illness can influence your experience of your illness, as well as your mental set about how and whether you will heal. This post will address some of these issues.


In a qualitative study by Linda Darrell (2016), people with end-stage renal disease who drew on their religious beliefs for meaning, strength, and hope it seemed to have a less upsetting experience of their illness than those who did not. Some of the themes that were found in the study were that “prayer develops faith and strength” and that it develops faith, which in turn supports “coping and hope” (p. 193).[i] Many of the people in the study relied on God to get them through this difficult experience.


Their faith also help them reduce interpersonal conflict in their homes, guided them in decision-making, help them bear emotional and physical pain and weariness, and to adapt and change to the demands of the illness. Some found that their belief in God preventing them from giving up in life; for others it allowed them to face their mortality. For other people, who did not have a religious sense of spirituality, they found solace and hope in nature or in having a goodhearted lifestyle. Other studies have found that a focus on positive emotion can be spiritual, such as using loving-kindness meditation and focusing on gratitude for what the person already has. Increasing optimism can also have a substantial effect on wellness, although it’s important to distinguish between unrealistic optimism and a positive attitude that fosters self-efficacy and an active interest in one’s own well-being.[ii]


Optimism seems to benefit one’s health most prominently in middle age, based on a longitudinal study by George Vailliant, who found the most robust correlation between optimism and good health at age 45.[iii] These can help lift people who have chronic illness as well as those who are physically healthy. Mindfulness-based stress reduction can help people with pain and other mental and physical illnesses focus on their body in the present moment without judgment or catastrophic thinking.[iv]


Spirituality can also help people gain a greater perspective on the crises and losses in their lives. In discussing post-traumatic growth, Dr. Seligman discusses how each experience has both positive and negative aspects: “Loss and gain both happen. Grief and gratitude both happen. Vulnerability and strength both happen[v]" (p. 162). When we view the potentially traumatic incidents in our lives, we have the option of thinking about how we got through it and what resources we called upon in order to transcend that particular passage of our lives, rather than focusing on all the ways that it hurt or damaged us.


There are a number of ways that spirituality can help us heal mentally and physically. It might be helpful to ask yourself how you are using spirituality in your life to make yourself feel better and improve the quality of your life. Whether you’re connecting to nature, living more mindfully in the present, or participating in an organized religion, connecting to a power greater than yourself maybe a helpful adjunct to your wellness plan. Coaching can help improve spiritual, emotional, social and financial wellness. If you're interested in receiving coaching, please call 661-233-6771.

------------------------------------------------------------

References:

Darrell, L. (2016). Faith that God cares: the experiences spirituality with African-American hemodialysis patients. Social Work & Christianity, 43(2), 189-212. [i]

Peterson, C. (2006). A Primer In Positive Psychology. New York, New York: Oxford University press, Inc. [iii]

CF Peterson, 2006. [iv]

Weir, K. (2014). Beyond tired: chronic fatigue syndrome remains misunderstood and understudied. Psychologists are among those trying to change that. American psychological Association Monitor, 45(9). [v]

Seligman, M. (2011). Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding Of Happiness And Well-Being. New York, NY: Atria Paperback, a division of Simon & Schuster.

------------------------------------------------------------

How do you use spirituality in your life?

What is your mental set towards your mental health? your physical health?

How can you incorporate a connection to all that is in your everyday existence? ============================================================ Copyright 2018 by Lisa Larsen, PsyD. All Rights Reserved/


12 views1 comment

Contact Me

I look forward to helping you move forward with your life. Please call my office at 661-233-6771 to see if I am the right fit for you. You can also email me below.

Lisa S. Larsen, Psy.D.

(CA Lic. #PSY19046)

3123 West Avenue L-8

Lancaster, CA  93536

661-233-6771

© 2018  by  Lisa S. Larsen, PsyD. Proudly created with Wix.com